Luster’s Quest: The Castlevania Adventure pt. 1

I probably should have posted about this back when I was actually in the thick of it, but for a while there I was really stabbing hard at the Castlevania series in my free time. Yes, that long-rest’d, well worn, and notoriously difficult saga as first appeared in America on the Nintendo Entertainment System in the year 1987.

I was six years old. Head like a giant apple, hands stained with chocolate pudding snacks.


Frankly, I never was able to solve a single one of the original trilogy back in those glowing days of youth, no matter how long I sat plunked down in front of my NES. Odd then that now, when I probably have the least available time to do so—and about ten times less the appropriate level of patience—I plowed through Castlevania, Castlevania II: Simon’s Quest, and the Japanese version of III, Akumajo Densetsu.

To say that these were hefty accomplishments to me would be a whopper of an understatement. Had you been unfortunate enough to live anywhere near me during that period, you would have no doubt heard me wax heroic about my exploits in Castle Dracul. I once not-so-famously held a very lengthy bar conversation regarding the difficulty of completing the first Castlevania (I had done so earlier that day), a chat that came equipped with so many personal pats on the back that, had you seen my bare skin, an embarrassingly red palm print would have pulsated and pounded your senses like the dancing lights of a crime scene.

It is with this humble opening that I begin this series, as much in the interest of reviving actual writing on this blog as it is concentrated and gloriously pulp-free braggadocio. It is a tale not only of victory over seemingly insurmountable odds, but of triumph over impatience and a presumably agéd degradation of TV game dexterity. Consider it your very own chalice through which your person may be reborn, free to conquer those sand-blasted challenges that humbled your bygone years.

This… is Luster’s Quest.

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